GENERAL QUESTIONS

Do you have standard designs we can choose from?

Each chuppah I make is custom-designed for that couple or family. This allows me the greatest flexibility in creating the perfect chuppah for you. For inspiration, you can view some of my past work in Portfolio to see chuppahs other couples have chosen.

What is the lead time for a custom chuppah?

To allow time to create the design as well as to make the chuppah, a lead time of 6 months or more is ideal. On rare occasions I may be able to accommodate a shorter lead time.

Do you work with clients outside the Chicago area?

Yes! I’ve designed and made chuppahs for clients throughout the U.S. and Canada.

 

QUESTIONS ABOUT CHUPPAHS

Who can be married under a chuppah?

A chuppah–whether called by that name or simply as a “wedding canopy”–is a timeless symbol of love and commitment, a sacred space where people come together to be joined in love. While many of my clients are couples planning Jewish or interfaith weddings, I welcome requests from couples of all backgrounds who would like to include this beautiful tradition in their wedding.

What is the best method for hanging a chuppah?

The most common methods are freestanding (on a frame) and hand-held (on poles). Which you choose is a matter of personal preference. There may also be practical reasons to choose one or the other: If your wedding ceremony needs to be “moveable” a hand-held chuppah goes up quickly and can be used anywhere. A larger or weightier chuppah is probably better supported by a frame.

Do you supply poles or a frame with the chuppah?

I don’t. Usually the hanging method for your chuppah (poles, a frame, or an alternate method) is arranged with your florist, event planner or venue.

 

QUESTIONS ABOUT THE DESIGN PROCESS

How does your design process work?

The design process begins with a consultation, where we talk about your ideas for your chuppah and discuss some possible options. Based on our chat I make initial sketches. After a round or two of revisions, we arrive at a final design, at which point we sign a contract and you place a deposit. Then I make the chuppah for you!

Can you make other items to coordinate with our chuppah?

Yes. Items that are particularly nice to coordinate with your chuppah include a cloth for the table under the chuppah, breaking-glass bag, ring pillow and challah cover.

Will you make a copy of a chuppah I found on another site?

I can’t copy another designer’s work, but I’m happy to talk about what you love about the other chuppah, and use that insight to create a new design especially for you.

 

QUESTIONS ABOUT USING HEIRLOOM MATERIALS

I’m interested in having some of our family heirlooms made into a chuppah. What are the options?

Many types of textile items can potentially be used as material in a chuppah. Large items like tablecloths can be supported with additional fabric and used in their entirety. Smaller items like handkerchiefs, silk scarves, embroidered items and tallit can be combined or used as accents. Photographs and other non-fabric items can be scanned and printed on fabric, then applied to the chuppah.

As a rule, heirloom material should be clean and ready to use when submitted to me for use in a chuppah.

I want to use my mother’s wedding dress as material for a chuppah. How feasible is this? 

Each wedding dress is unique, and so are the challenges that go with repurposing their material. Many wedding dresses from the 1950s-1990s are made of synthetic fabrics that do not adapt well to being recut and resewn. Dresses “preserved” or stored in non-acid-free environments may be weakened or discolored from storage.

Because of the need to evaluate the dress thoroughly before deciding if it can be used as material for a chuppah, I can only offer this option to clients who are local to the Chicago area.

If the fabric of the dress is questionable, or if you are not local, it’s still possible to incorporate other elements of a wedding dress into a chuppah. Lace, buttons and decorative embellishments from the original dress can be combined with new fabric to create a chuppah that has the spirit of the original dress but is strong enough to last long into the future.